An overview of the utilitarian theory

The second context concerns the content of the rules and how they are applied in actual cases. Shaw provides a clear, comprehensive discussion of utilitarianism and its critics as well as defending utilitarianism.

For this reason, principles that appeal to duty to God are not usually cited since this would have no impact on a nonbeliever engaged in the debate.

James Mill argued for representative government and universal male suffrage on utilitarian grounds; he and other followers of Bentham were advocates of parliamentary reform in England in the early 19th century. Utility ignores justice[ edit ] As Rosen [22] has pointed out, claiming that act utilitarians are not concerned about having rules is to set up a "straw man".

Act utilitarianism

The question, however, is not what we usually do, but what we ought to do, and it is difficult to see any sound moral justification for the view that distance, or community membership, makes a crucial difference to our obligations.

Their method for determining the well-being of a group involved adding up the benefits and losses that members of the group would experience as a result of adopting one action or policy. It says that we can produce more beneficial results by following rules than by always performing individual actions whose results are as beneficial as possible.

Act and Rule Utilitarianism

If the bad consequences are greater, then the action is morally improper. If the overall aim is to maximize the well-being of all people in all cities, for example, then we are likely to get better results by having individuals who know and understand particular cities focus on them while other people focus on other cities.

Similarly, Hare refers to "the crude caricature of act utilitarianism which is the only version of it that many philosophers seem to be acquainted with. Mill defines utilitarianism as a theory based on the principle that "actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.

According to Mill, good actions result in pleasure, and that there is no higher end than pleasure. In fact, however, the theory is complex because we cannot understand that single principle unless we know at least three things: Table of Contents Summary Utilitarianism, by John Stuart Mill, is an essay written to provide support for the value of utilitarianism as a moral theory, and to respond to misconceptions about it.

Normative Principles in Applied Ethics Arriving at a short list of representative normative principles is itself a challenging task.

Smart as the title to his reply to Popper [60] in which he argued that the principle would entail seeking the quickest and least painful method of killing the entirety of humanity.

A different other-worldly approach to the metaphysical status of morality is divine commands issuing from God's will. Wrong Answers and Crude Concepts Although rule utilitarians try to avoid the weaknesses attributed to act utilitarianism, critics argue that they cannot avoid these weaknesses because they do not take seriously many of our central moral concepts.

Such precise measurement as Bentham envisioned is perhaps not essential, but it is nonetheless necessary for the utilitarian to make some interpersonal comparisons of the values of the effects of alternative courses of action. The theory of utilitarianism has been criticized for many reasons.

In all probability, it was not a distinction that Mill was particularly trying to make and so the evidence in his writing is inevitably mixed.

Utilitarianism

Were the offence considered only under this point of view, it would not be easy to assign any good reasons to justify the rigour of the laws. This issue is not merely a hypothetical case. It involves our saying that, even if the total quantity of pleasure in each was exactly equal, yet the fact that all the beings in the one possessed in addition knowledge of many different kinds and a full appreciation of all that was beautiful or worthy of love in their world, whereas none of the beings in the other possessed any of these things, would give us no reason whatever for preferring the former to the latter.

Nonetheless, these discretionary actions are permitted because having a rule in these cases does not maximize utility or because the best rule may impose some constraints on how people act while still permitting a lot of discretion in deciding what to do.

If Baby Doe survived, its quality of life would have been poor and in any case it probably would have died at an early age. The reason for this is that the practice of promise-keeping is a very valuable. He supports this claim by showing that all the other objects of people's desire are either means to happiness, or included in the definition of happiness.

Utilitarianism and the Enlightenment. The science of the Enlightenment featured theories with a very small number of general laws and vast explanatory power. Newton’s laws, for example, seemed able to account for all of the motion in the universe.

Utilitarianism fit right in: it was an ethical theory compatible with science and featuring a. Lesson Summary. Utilitarianism is a theory in normative ethics, or the ethics that define the morality of actions, as proposed by Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill.

It is defined by utility, the existence of pleasure and the absence of pain. Utilitarianism sees happiness as existing in low and high pleasures.

Smart’s discussion combines an overview of moral theory and a defense of act utilitarianism. It is followed by Bernard Williams’, “A Critique of Utilitarianism,” a source of many important criticisms of utilitarianism.

Essay The Moral Theory Of Act Utilitarianism. Act-utilitarianism, is the view that the rightness or wrongness of an action is to be judged by its consequences, that is the maximisation of utility - whether or not said action is good or bad. Aug 21,  · Utilitarianism as an ethics theory primarily values the good of the community over the good of the individual.

One might think of it as “the ends justify the means.” In other words, the metric for a good utilitarian action is the degree to which it benefits the. Summary. Utilitarianism, by John Stuart Mill, is an essay written to provide support for the value of utilitarianism as a moral theory, and to respond to misconceptions about it.

Mill defines utilitarianism as a theory based on the principle that "actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.".

An overview of the utilitarian theory
Rated 0/5 based on 65 review
Utilitarianism | philosophy | elonghornsales.com